Saturday, May 25, 2019

Deaths of beloved doctors, violent tornadoes among most visited Turner Report/Inside Joplin posts for the week

During a week when Inside Joplin Obituaries posted its 9,000th obituary since launching in November 2013, the traffic to the blog was heavier than usual and that can be attributed to the passing of two people who devoted their lives to helping others.

Dr. Donald Patterson was a fixture in the Joplin medical community for six decades, but his service extended far beyond that.

Even before he began practicing medicine, Dr. Patterson was making a difference- as a highly decorated airman in the U. S. Army Air Force during World War II. He later served his country once again, as a flight doctor in the U. S. Air Force during World War II.

Dr. Patterson's 91 years were filled with accomplishments and have had a lasting impact on this area.







The same can be said for Dr. Timothy Sprenkle, whose skills as an emergency room physician were responsible for saving countless lives before his untimely passing this week at age 56 as a result of a system weakened by a series of bites from a brown recluse spider.

I cannot even imagine the pressures of being an emergency room physician, but it was something that Dr. Sprenkle handled skillfully for nearly 30 years.

Both men left behind a legacy of service and will be missed.

Tornadoes strike again

While the deaths of Dr. Sprenkle and Dr; Patterson were the most visited posts on Inside Joplin Obituaries, the violent tornadoes that ripped through this area of the state and Jefferson City naturally received the most interest on the Turner Report and Inside Joplin.

Each year since the Joplin Tornado, I have revisited some of the posts I wrote eight years ago, but not this year.

The tornadoes hitting on the anniversary of the Joplin Tornado were the only ones I was going to mention on that day. Any retrospectives can wait until a May 22 when the sun is shining brightly or the stars are blanketing the sky.

I was more than mildly irritated by the national media's constant mentions of the Joplin Tornado when talking about the storm that killed three Golden City residents.

While the anniversary made it a natural news hook, Golden City is more than a half hour away from Joplin.

I had the honor of being the final editor of Golden City's last newspaper and it is Golden City that is suffering through this tragedy and not Joplin, though we, of course, can certainly understand what the residents are going through.

Golden City is a great community, now as it was when I was there in 1979 with the Lockwood Luminary-Golden City Herald.

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Thanks for supporting the Turner Report, Inside Joplin and Inside Joplin Obituaries.

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The Top 10 most visited posts on the Turner Report, Inside Joplin and Inside Joplin Obituaries and links to each of those posts are featured below:

The Turner Report

1. Video: Massive tornado hits Jefferson City

2. This is insane: Devastation of Jefferson City tornado shown in local resident's Facebook video

3. Missouri Legislature passes laws eliminating helmet requirements for motorcycle riders, cutting vehicle inspections

4. Funeral services scheduled for Golden City couple killed in tornado

5. Department of Public Safety: Nine hospitalized in Jefferson City due to tornado, not the 100 that had been reported

6. Carthage R-9 Board hires nine teachers, accepts three resignations

7. CNN coverage of Missouri tornadoes- eight years to the day after Joplin Tornado

8. Parson to meet with Briarbrook residents this afternoon, spoke to family members of those who were killed in Golden City

9. Golden City couple killed in tornado described as "hard-working, selfless"

10. Former Jasper fireman/child molester's wife pleads guilty to felony charge

Inside Joplin

1, Elderly Golden City couple killed in tornado, another woman killed, her husband seriously injured

2. Carthage man seriously injured in accident on Chestnut Road

3. Carl Junction Police Department reports people trying to charge to do repairs in tornado-damaged Briarbrook area

4. Tornado confirmed near Seneca moving northeast

5. Significant hail, lightning possible today, tonight for Joplin area, tornado risk decreasing

6. Storm damage closes Fir Road entrance to Carl Junction

7. Joplin Police Department Arrests May 22-23

8. Jasper County Dissolution of Marriage Petitions

9. Highway Patrol Arrests May 24-25

10. Neosho man taken to Mercy Springfield after being seriously injured in fiery accident

Inside Joplin Obituaries

1, Timothy Sprenkle

2. Donald Patterson

3. Tara Miksell

4. Kenneth Bentlage

5. Richard Packer

6. Connie Riddle

7. Dianne Jones

8. Maria Martinez

9. Robert Wallace

10. Tom Elliott

Nancy Hughes: Don't wave off the warning

“These things happened to them as examples and were written down as
warnings for us, on whom the fulfillment of the ages has come.”
I Corinthians 10:11 (NIV)


“What in the world is going on?” I thought to myself the other day as I watched arms waving from car after car as drivers tried frantically to flag down a woman in a little red van getting ready to pull onto the interstate.

A few seconds later I spotted the reason: a big coffee mug and an even bigger camera were hitching a ride on the roof of the van. The woman behind the wheel kept driving, completely oblivious to the people trying to help the “hitchhikers” on her roof avoid a messy and disastrous end to their ride.

She finally glanced at the drivers but, ignoring their frantic waving and gesturing, she simply smiled, waved back . . . and drove on. Somewhere down the highway as she picked up speed, the coffee mug and camera would fly off the van roof and smash into the highway.

Had she simply stopped long enough to see why the drivers were gesturing toward the top of her van, she would have immediately realized that they were trying to warn her of a sure catastrophe.










God’s Word is full of warnings and caution signs designed to “flag us down” before we, like the van driver, are faced with certain disaster. He knows that decisions and choices that we make as Christians will not be welcomed by those in the world and He continually warns us to hold on to His Word when we feel overwhelmed, vulnerable and weak.

He also knows that our enemy will always be on the attack and we cannot let up for a single minute as we guard against him. We are told in I Peter 5:8 to “Be self-controlled and alert. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour.” Now that is a warning we all need to heed!

Just as an earthly father warns his children about dangers around them, how much more our Heavenly Father continually cautions us to keep our focus on Him as He points us in the right direction for our lives.

And if we don’t heed His warnings? If we ignore all His attempts to get our attention? Then we will face the consequences of deciding to smile, wave and continue down the path we have chosen.

I urge you today not to ignore the “waving arms” in your path. They may be counsel from a Godly Christian friend or a devotional you read one morning or a verse in the Bible that speaks to your heart. No matter the form they may take, please recognize them as our Father’s longing to “flag us down” and direct our paths away from flying mugs and cameras.

Father, how many times have I raced ahead and not heeded your warnings in my life. And how many times could a bad decision have been averted if only I had looked to you. Please help me to spend time in your Word and to seek your will in my life. In Jesus’ Name. Amen.

R.A.P. it up . . .


Reflect

Can you think of a time in which you felt the Lord placing warning signs in your path but you still went ahead with your plans?

What were your reasons for ignoring those warning signs? What was the result?

Apply

Ask a Godly prayer warrior who is continually in the Word to be an accountability partner with you and to pray with you as decisions require answers in your life.

Keep a prayer journal of Scripture that encourages you to seek the Lord in all areas of your life before making important decisions.

Power

I Corinthians 10:11 (NIV) “These things happened to them as examples and were written down as warnings for us, on whom the fulfillment of the ages has come.”

I Corinthians 4:14 (NIV) “I am not writing this to shame you, but to warn you, as my dear children.”

Ephesians 6:11 (NIV) “Put on the full armor of God so that you can take your stand against the devil’s schemes.”

(For more of Nancy Hughes' writing, check out her blog, Encouragement from the War Room.)

Kim Frencken: Why I hate callbacks

Did I mention that I hate callbacks? Well, just in case I didn't, I hate callbacks. They make work for some of you, but personally I feel like I'm talking to myself (and in most cases I am since kids are only repeating a rote response).

 I know that this is a hot educational trend. I know teachers that insist they are the best thing to happen to education since the Stone Age. I know they are cute and they are fun. But still... I hate them. And here's why.

Callbacks do not identify a child as an individual. They are generic. Students are not called by name. They are now called Class. The old tricks that worked, like proximity or eye contact, identified an individual. 

 Callbacks replace names with labels and rhythmic patterns. A number one priority for any teacher is to develop a relationship with her students. That's when a class ceases to be just a class. They become her kids. 








 Developing relationships starts with a name. Then it builds on knowing the person with that name. A child is no longer only a member of the group. They are an individual that matters.

Using names encourages children to participate. Asking a class, "do we have anyone that would like to share?" will get a different response than asking an individual to share their awesome story about dinosaurs. A child is a person that is special and has something special to share. They are not a pronoun.

Callbacks take away a student's responsibility. It is not the student's responsibility to do what the teacher is asking, it is the teacher's responsibility to first get the student's attention. I think teachers have enough responsibility without having to clap and chant our way into our students' focus. 

 If I am teaching a lesson, why should I stop periodically and snap, clap, snap in order to refocus the class. Because kids are not being asked to focus. They are being asked to mimic a response. Kids should be allowed to make choices - good or bad - and learn from them. Kids are not puppets.

Finally, I think callbacks are conditioning. Training children to respond to a key word or sound. How many parents or businesses use callbacks to get the attention of their child or employee? I can't think of any. 

If my parents had used callbacks, I would have let my responsible sister do what they were asking. Why should I be bothered beyond a simple response? 

On the other hand, when I heard my name called, I knew mom meant me. Not my sister or some other kid. Me. And I knew that I had to respond. It was personal. Today, kids think that you have to use callbacks if you want them to listen, complete a task, or line up. Don't believe me? Go into a classroom that depends on callbacks and try getting their attention with a song and dance. At some point, they may even tell you that you have to use callbacks if you want them to listen. Truth. This is either a case of callbacks misused or callbacks gone wild.

Callbacks should not be a classroom management system, but rather a support used rarely. If you develop relationships with your kids, you won't need to clap and dance around the room. Your kids will listen out of respect (the other "R" word).

(For more of Kim Frencken's writing, check out her blog, Chocolate For the Teacher.)

Missouri Southern mourns the passing of Glenn Dolence

(From Southern News Service)

Dr. Glenn Dolence, a former longtime Vice President of Student Affairs at Missouri Southern State University, passed away on Friday, May 24.

“Dr. Dolence was the ultimate example of leadership and service to students,” said Dr. Alan Marble, president of Missouri Southern. “His lifelong support and enthusiasm for the Lion family will be missed.”

During his 27 years at Missouri Southern, Dolence served as dean of men, athletic director, dean of students and served as vice president for student services until his retirement in 1996. He is survived by his wife, Myrna, who he met at Southern where she was dean of women. She later became a counselor and founded the Student Success Center.

“Dr. Dolence was a vital part of Missouri Southern for decades,” said Darren Fullerton, vice president of student affairs. “His dedication and service impacted the lives of countless Missouri Southern students, faculty and staff members.”










Dr. Glenn Dolence, a former longtime Vice President of Student Affairs at Missouri Southern State University, passed away on Friday, May 24.

“Dr. Dolence was the ultimate example of leadership and service to students,” said Dr. Alan Marble, president of Missouri Southern. “His lifelong support and enthusiasm for the Lion family will be missed.” 

During his 27 years at Missouri Southern, Dolence served as dean of men, athletic director, dean of students and served as vice president for student services until his retirement in 1996. He is survived by his wife, Myrna, who he met at Southern where she was dean of women. She later became a counselor and founded the Student Success Center. 










“Dr. Dolence was a vital part of Missouri Southern for decades,” said Darren Fullerton, vice president of student affairs. “His dedication and service impacted the lives of countless Missouri Southern students, faculty and staff members.” 

Examples of Dolence’s leadership are still a part of MSSU. These include the establishment of the Golden Crest Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa, a national leadership honor society - and the Student Leadership awards and Leader of the Year award, which are named in his honor. 

“Dr. Dolence truly believed in developing and nurturing students, enhancing student leadership and encouraging civil engagement,” said Fullerton. 

“I could not have asked for a better mentor or friend.” “Dolence’s contributions to Missouri Southern and its students will long be remembered at the university. Glenn brought honor, dignity and compassion to his work at MSSU,” said Marble. 

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family at this difficult time.” A visitation and memorial service will be held on Tuesday, May 28 at Central United Methodist Church in Webb City. The visitation is scheduled to run from 10:00 a.m. to noon, with the memorial service scheduled to begin at 2:30 p.m.

Examples of Dolence’s leadership are still a part of MSSU. These include the establishment of the Golden Crest Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa, a national leadership honor society - and the Student Leadership awards and Leader of the Year award, which are named in his honor.

“Dr. Dolence truly believed in developing and nurturing students, enhancing student leadership and encouraging civil engagement,” said Fullerton. “I could not have asked for a better mentor or friend.”

“Dolence’s contributions to Missouri Southern and its students will long be remembered at the university. Glenn brought honor, dignity and compassion to his work at MSSU,” said Marble. “Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family at this difficult time.”

A visitation and memorial service will be held on Tuesday, May 28 at Central United Methodist Church in Webb City. The visitation is scheduled to run from 10:00 a.m. to noon, with the memorial service scheduled to begin at 2:30 p.m.

Friday, May 24, 2019

Services scheduled for longtime MSSU official Glenn Dolence

Funeral services for longtime Missouri Southern State University official Glenn Dolence, who today at age 82, are scheduled for 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at Central United Methodist Church in Webb City.

Visitation will be held 10 a.m. to 12 noon Tuesday at the church.

Dr. Dolence was vice president for student affairs and formerly served as the dean of men.

He retired in 1996 after serving at the university for 27 years.








Dr. Dolence's influence at Missouri Southern has continued through the years because of the mentoring he gave to those who followed him, current vice president of student affairs Darren Fullerton said at a a November 2017 ceremony naming the Student Affairs Suite on the third floor of the Billingsly Student Center after Dr. Dolence and his wife Myrna.

Southern's annual Leadership/Service awards are named after Dr. Dolence, who said he believed in former President Harry S Truman's saying- "it's amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit."

A complete obituary for Dr. Dolence will be posted later on Inside Joplin Obituaries.





Missouri State Parks offers free use of campgrounds to those displaced by tornadoes

(From Missouri State Parks)

Missouri residents, who have been displaced from their homes due to damage caused by the recent tornadoes, are eligible to stay in any Missouri State Park campground without cost.

This spring, Missouri State Parks offered free camping to Missouri residents who were displaced from their homes due to flooding. Missouri State Parks is extending the same offer to those affected by the recent tornadoes and storm damage that struck southwest and central Missouri earlier this week.

Missouri residents will be allowed to stay up to 30 days in any state park campground. All campsites will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. Campers will need to bring their own camping equipment and other supplies.

“Recent tornado and storm damages have devastated many families and individuals," said Ben Ellis, director of the Division of State Parks. "This is one way Missouri State Parks can assist them until they can return to their homes.”







People requesting the fee waiver should provide documentation from a governmental or charitable organization certifying they have been displaced by flooding in any county in Missouri.

For more information about Missouri state park campgrounds, call 800-334-6946 (voice) or 800-379-2419 (Telecommunications Device for the Deaf) or visit mostateparks.com.       

Parson offers update on state tornado response

(From Gov. Mike Parson)

Governor Mike Parson this afternoon commended public safety and public works crews, businesses and utilities, and volunteers whose work is speeding Missouri’s recovery from a historic night of severe storms on May 22.

In Jefferson City, a team of volunteer engineers, architects, building inspectors, and other trained professionals today began assessing the estimated 500 homes and buildings believed to have sustained damage to determine which are safe and which should be evacuated. On Saturday, the Missouri Structural Assessment and Visual Evaluation (S.A.V.E.) Coalition is expected to evaluate about 200 additional structures in Cole County that are reported to have been damaged.

Of the first 321 structures reviewed today, the S.A.V.E. Coalition reported the following:
78 Unsafe (Severely damaged and cannot be occupied – Red placard.)
60 Restricted Use (A portion of the building is unsafe – Yellow placard.)
183 Safe for Reentry (Structurally safe to occupy – Green placard.)










The S.A.V.E. team, which works under the Missouri State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA), is assisting the Jefferson City Building Department.

S.A.V.E. inspections are exterior inspections only. Inspectors look for structural damage, such as partially collapsed buildings, buildings moved off their foundations, leaning buildings, damage to supports, falling hazards from chimneys or walls, or other hazards like gas leaks or downed power lines.

“As they always do, Missourians are meeting difficult circumstances with grit, determination, hard work, and good will,” Governor Parson said. “As I traveled the state yesterday and observed the devastation from Wednesday night storms, I saw people hard at work and lending a hand everywhere I went. Missouri utilities and businesses have brought on extra workers and are working extended shifts; public service workers are doing yeoman’s work, and volunteers are making a difference. The results are clear. Missouri is making strong progress in our recovery from this challenge.”

Governor Parson pointed to progress in these other areas:

State Facilities Restoration: The Missouri Office of Administration (OA) has taken the following actions so that all state employees can return to work on Tuesday: begun cleanup efforts, worked with contractors to repair damaged buildings and roofs, worked with Ameren Missouri to restore power to several buildings, recovered IT equipment from damaged buildings, and identified temporary work spaces for employees in damaged buildings. At the Division of Employment Security building on Dunklin Street, OA has assisted in moving employees to temporary work spaces and worked to repair the HVAC system, as well as cleaning debris and helping Ameren Missouri restore power to the building.

Power Restoration: Efforts by Ameren Missouri and Three Rivers Electric Cooperative, bolstered by additional crews, have greatly reduced outages. Friday morning, in the Jefferson City area, Ameren Missouri was reporting about 3,000 outages. Three Rivers Electric was reporting about 900 outages in Cole County and about 250 in Miller County. Power is expected to be completely restored Saturday. There were more than 14,000 total outages on Thursday.

Communications Restoration: Verizon, which sustained damage that affected 19 sites in the Jefferson City area has deployed three mobile cellular sites and a mobile community center at City Hall to support first responders and affected community members with wireless communications. The company is also providing a recharging station, laptops with internet connectivity, and an air-conditioned mobile facility to support survivors and volunteers. It’s also offering unlimited calling, text, and data for customers impacted by the Missouri tornadoes.

Communications Restoration: U.S. Cellular, whose service was affected by the storms in Miller, Barton, and Jasper counties, deployed generators and partnered with another carrier to raise call capacity.

Law Enforcement: In addition to assisting local public safety agencies responding to calls for service, search and rescue, and security details in Jefferson City, Golden City and Carl Junction, theMissouri State Highway Patrol provided 21 of its law enforcement academy recruits to direct traffic in damaged areas of Jefferson City on Thursday. Also, nine Patrol troopers assisted by handling regular police calls for service in the Jefferson City area on Thursday. Patrol aircraft have been assisting with aerial damage assessments.

Governor Parson also urged Missourians to pay close attention to the weather over the Memorial Day weekend because of expected heavy rainfall that could worsen flooding and the potential for severe weather. The National Weather Service Kansas City Office is forecasting up to three inches of rain in northwest Missouri by early Saturday morning, resulting in a Flash Flood Watch. The Kansas City NWS office is calling for a total of 4-6 inches of rainfall for parts of Missouri over the next seven days. This is now expected to push flooded rivers to higher levels than previously forecast.



















Billy Long: We must make sure the only immigrants we allow in are the right ones

(From Seventh District Congressman Billy Long)

Last month, I had the honor of speaking at a naturalization ceremony at Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield where I welcomed 54 new U.S. citizens.

As I watched each one of these men and women take the Oath of Allegiance, I was reminded once again of how great our country is and the importance of the rule of law. These brave individuals came to this country legally and abided by our immigration system. Sadly, that’s becoming less and less common.

As Democrats continue to take no action, the crisis at the southern border will only get worse. This April, over 109,000 illegal immigrants, 10,000 of those being unaccompanied minors, arrived at the southern border. This was a five percent increase from March. To make matters even worse, apprehensions at the southern border were up 590 percent compared to last April.

Last week, I was present at the White House as President Trump laid out his plan to fix our broken immigration system that hasn’t been comprehensively reformed since the 1960s. His two-part approach includes securing the border and reforming the system.








President Trump’s plan would create a self-sustaining border security fund, which would be funded by fees and revenues collected at ports of entry. This money would go towards fully securing our border and ensuring that all goods and individuals crossing are properly inspected.

For too long, our outdated immigration laws have allowed people crossing our borders to exploit our system, increasing the number of illegal activities. President Trump’s plan would close these loopholes, allow legitimate asylum seekers the due process they deserve and send the abusers back home.

In the U.S., nearly 70 percent of immigrants came based on family relationships rather than merit. President Trump’s plan would change that, creating a point-based system focusing only on skill or merit. This system would protect American workers who continue to be hurt by an immigration system that lowers their wages by setting wage floors and recruitment requirements.

President Trump’s plan is a common-sense solution to a problem that has only gotten worse over the years. I support the president and will continue to do my part in Congress by advocating for comprehensive immigration reform that puts America first.

Ed Martin on signing of anti-abortion bill: All Missourians are proud of the legislature and governor

(From Phyllis Schlafly Eagles)

Missouri Governor Mike Parson signed Missouri's Heartbeat Bill this morning, making Missouri the fifth state in 2019 to make the measure law. Known as "Missouri Stands for the Unborn Act," Missouri's take on the legislation included many additional protections and layers.

"Today all Missourians are proud of the legislature and governor for taking a stand on this defining issue," said Ed Martin, president of Phyllis Schlafly Eagles. 

"As the ugly beliefs of the Democratic party show their true face, Americans are making their strong pro-life values known. 








"Protecting the right to life is the most fundamental issue Americans face today. Thanks to the unflappable work of Janet Porter and lawmakers like Rep. Steve King (R-IA), we now have a vehicle that will not only save the lives of American children but will withstand the judicial attacks of the left. 

"We look forward to seeing this measure pass other states. I pray this bold move by Missouri will cause the ultimate downfall of Roe v. Wade in Trump's Supreme Court."

Parson signs strict anti-abortion bill

(From Gov. Mike Parson)

This morning at the State Capitol, Governor Parson joined with House and Senate members and pro-life coalition leaders to sign House Bill 126. The bill was passed by super-majorities in both the House and the Senate.

“By signing this bill today, we are sending a strong signal to the nation that, in Missouri, we stand for life, protect women’s health, and advocate for the unborn,” said Governor Mike Parson. “All life has value and is worth protecting.”

HB 126, also known as the “Missouri Stands for the Unborn Act”, prohibits an abortion in a non-medical emergency past eight weeks of gestational age and ensures the protection of women’s safety. HB 126 prohibits an individual from performing or inducing an abortion solely because of a diagnosis of potential for Down Syndrome in an unborn child or because of the race or sex of the unborn child.

HB 126 contains an emergency clause that requires written notification of a parent or guardian by the custodial parent or guardian of consent for an abortion to be performed on a minor. The bill expands the definition of a pregnancy resource center for tax credit purposes to include facilities that provide assistance to families as well. In addition, this bill removes the sunset and cumulative tax credit cap beginning in FY 2021 and increases the pregnancy resource center tax credit from 50 percent to 70 percent beginning January 1, 2021.








The Governor encourages all Missourians to get involved in efforts to support life in their communities, whether that’s opening your family’s home to adoption to assist children in need, volunteering at your local pregnancy resource center, or joining with your faith community to provide the necessary support to help individuals choose life.

Governor Parson continued, “Thanks to decades of pro-life leadership, Missouri recently hit an all-time low for the number of abortions. We’ve gone from a high of more than 20,000 in our state, to now below 3,000. By working together, we can continue to assist more Missourians in choosing life.”

The Governor also signed SB 21, which adds the cities of Portageville, Riverside, and Fayette to the list of cities authorized to propose a sales tax for the purposes of improving public safety. The sales tax cannot exceed a rate of 0.5 percent. This bill also modifies the City Sales Tax Act to allow cities to propose a sales tax for general city purposes at a rate not to exceed one percent instead of at a rate of 0.5 percent, 0.875 percent, or 1 percent. SB 21 bill contains an emergency clause and will become law upon the Governor’s signature.